Delivering discreet and effective ventilation

Air Diffusion, Flowbar, ventilation, air distribution, grilles, diffusers

Air Diffusion reports a dramatic increase in demand for its FlowBar range of high-capacity linear slot diffusers for their ability to fit discreetly into a stylish interior to provide both practical and aesthetic benefits. These diffusers are suitable for ceiling or sidewall applications.

FlowBar diffusers are available in straight lines or curves to blend with other architectural elements and enhance the overall concept of the project, while ensuring the occupied space is adequately and efficiently ventilated.

Integral pattern controllers are 300 to 600 mm long and allow the airstream to be directed left and right for horizontal and vertical airflow. Standard slot sizes are 25, 38 and 51 mm, with single section lengths available up to 2400 mm.

Standard finish is a polyester powder coating.

Among the models available are the FlowBar High Throw (HT) Series, which is primarily designed for ceiling applications and allows the air diffusers to become inconspicuous, whilst fully integrating into the ceiling system.

The FlowBar Jet Throw (JT) series has wing blades to allow the airstream to be jetted in a horizontal direction (sidewall mounted) whilst fully integrating into the wall system. Jet Throw blades allow extended throws in typical high bay applications for heated and/or cooled air.

These are particularly useful along perimeter walls where heated air can be directed downward. Standard slot sizes are 25, 38 and 51 mm with single section lengths available up to 2400 mm.

Factory-engineered plenum boxes can be provided with all models.

The flexible, modular design means they can be configured in a wide variety of lengths and slot depths to fit in with an interior design. FlowBar is a product that naturally lends itself to bespoke solutions.

For more information on this story, click here: Sept 2017, 160
Related links:
Related articles:



modbs tv logo

Wellbeing and building services

Building services have a significant part to play in improving the wellbeing of occupants in offices. 

Part 2: Holding onto specifications

Alan Jamieson discusses how to keep specifications intact from the design to the completion, a common challenge in M&E engineering. 

Calendar